If it floats, flies or is in the cloud, you are better off renting…

The above bit of sagely financial advice was offered to me by a financial professional. Certain assets and items make no financial sense when you buy them, renting is the better option in many cases. Why should technology be any different?

I strongly believe that the days of buying physical servers at Capex cost is a business model that is dead for many enterprises. Why invest all that hard earned money in a dead platform, why not just rent what you need, elastically? Need more, rent more. Need less, rent less. Not only will your expenses match your requirements, but your get better proportional use from those rented assets.  Some recent reports puts the average utilization of servers running virtualization hypervisors in the enterprise datacentre, at between 20% and 40%. This implies that even “enterprise” virtualization is not delivering the value promised.

How do we solve this utilization issue? It needs to be solved as it implies that we are spending money on resources that we do not use. But getting benefit from this model means that we have to have modern application and infrastructure management technologies, so that we can “right size” our resources. Managing tech resources need to move beyond the “is it on or is it off” mindset, coupled with technology silos. No offense, but I do have a giggle when enterprises who get tools like Microsoft’s SCOM for free in their enterprise license agreements, think that these basic tools tell them anything about how the app is performing. No, today we need technology that will map our business rules and processes across infrastructure, showing us impact on business processes if a port on a device, or process on a server misbehaves. The issue here is cost. Most of these platforms need to gather various forms of data, including SNMP, WMI and packet level data. The best systems will even run a small agent on your .Net, SQL and Java systems, instrumenting these down to code level. But, in South African terms, a project like this could be anywhere from R 5 Million to R 10 Million, even for relatively small environments, with around 20 app servers and around 100 servers in total.

Solving this issue has been my mission. It is one of the reasons why our cloud platform can be called “enterprise grade”. Let me explain. The systems used to monitor the packet level data are dedicated hardware devices, capable of some serious data collection and analysis. However, when buying this technology, companies have to not only think about their data rates today, but also try and guess what the data rates will be 3-5 years down the line. Typically these assets get “sweat” a long time, so invariably, an enterprise buys a bigger box than what they need. Secondly, the tech to instrument your code gets sold in certain license batches, so you end up having to buy another 10 licenses, even if you only want to roll out another two servers, taking your total to 12. Having a cloud platform enabled that has this tech built in, makes it super easy for enterprises and software developers to have this technology “baked in” to their infrastructure. Now we get to a point, where we can deliver the following info:

  • How fast is my application for the end user using it, with total response time in milliseconds instrumented from the end user device, right down all the tiers of my application and infrastructure.
  • If my response is below par (my SLA requires a 400ms response time, but I am delivering a 900ms time), where is the delay? Network, server, app, code etc?
  • In multi-tiered applications, where we have a web front-end connected, to an app server, which in turn talks to a database, we can see the delay and details for performance between servers. So, a slow app may be slow because the connection between the web servers and app tier is slow, as a result of a bad configuration on a load balancer.
  • A new update was pushed for a .Net or Java based app, and now, certain modules of the app is slow. We can pinpoint these, and help developers debug and fix performance issues, as we can see exactly which piece of the app and code is causing an issue.
  • We can tie memory, CPU and storage system performance together, and see how changes in resource quantities (add more RAM, add more vCPU) is positively or negatively affecting app performance. You can also see if a bigger server is needed, or if two or three smaller servers, running with a load balancer will work better.
  • The network performance can be instrumented and modelled to the n-th degree. Is adding more capacity going to improve my performance, or will switching to a lower latency fibre optic link from my ISP improve my performance? Is accessing the service via Internet ok, or do I need to think about a dedicated point-to-point link to the cloud, or can I simply extend my MPLS service?

Understanding the impact of resource and their behaviour is key. With the right tools, you can rent just what you need. The right sizing job for CIO/CTO level managers just got so much easier…

Undocking your cloud

In a recent post I spoke about lock-in and how I hate being locked into services. Expanding on that topic, I should note that cloud services is a lot more elastic than other products we use or services we consume…up to a point. You can easily turn services on, off or move between plans. But moving from cloud platform A to B? Nope, not so easy… until now.

Docker is going to revolutionize the way we build, run and move applications around. Referring to my previous post, Docker is the way I am going to make it easy for you to get on my platform, run your apps, scale them and finally take them with if you decide to switch platforms. And if you go out there, try the others and realize my platform as best after all, Docker is how you get back in 🙂

So, what is Docker? This page will give you a great quick overview, but allow me to summarize here. Remember the old Java promise of “build once, run anywhere”? Well Docker is that promise delivered. You can have a quick start with 13000+ Dockerized applications or build your own. By using the Docker you can build an application, run it on any environment and finally ship it to any cloud platform that supports Docker and run the app at scale.

Have a look at it, if you are a Dev or SysAdmin guy, you’ll love this tech.

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“Cloud” and “The man on the street”

Last night I had the pleasure of taking one of my cousins, her husband and children out to dinner. Having not seen them in a while, it was great to catch up. And as you do, the conversation takes a few familiar roads, and that includes “work”. The question was quickly popped, for me to tell them about my latest project.

I went into as basic a description as I could about “cloud computing” and when done, Johan looked me squarely in the eye and asked, “so what does that mean for the man on the street?”. I started at him, winded and unsure. “The man on the street” did not factor into my planning at all…I realized that I should actually give this some thought.

My family lives in a small Eastern Cape town, have steady jobs and the kids are completing varsity. One is doing his articles on the road to being a Chartered Accountant, and the other specialized in radio therapy as part of oncology programs. Smart peeps. They also all arrived smartphone in hand, and that was the key for me this morning…

By having a platform that is hosted locally, data in our regulatory domain and connected to our local Internet backbone, must have benefit for us locals. One will be pure access speed. My datacenter connection can be upgraded at the drop of a hat for port access speed (no more waiting for Telkom to provide the access layer), guaranteeing great performance. Our platform is build on the latest generation hardware, sporting solid state drives in key location, allowing us to spin up services fast, and deliver data fast. Our platform-as-Service strategy will place tools in the hands of developers, to enable the rapid deployment, testing and scaling of apps. And, with us offering tools and promo’s to developers, we hope to stimulate innovation.

Back to the now infamous “man on the street” (or should that be “person” in our politically correct world?). For us as South Africans and Africans, I hope that this means more locally produced apps, things that speak to our cultures, languages and race. Build me an app that points me to the best Nyama and craft beer in the area, instead of an international app that rates restaurants and hotels. Where are the best kwaito and Afrikaans artists performing tonight, where can I get tickets? Build me a guided tour of Joburg, so that I can fire up an app and show my international guests places like Cape Town, Pretoria and Joburg in ways they could never imagine. Store your pictures and videos cheaply, in your local currency on server where you know your data lies in Cape Town or Joburg, and that the NSA will not be snooping it. Let’s innovate for South Africa, Africa and most importantly, the person on the street.