OpenStack “State of the nation”

Over the past few days I have had the pleasure of attending the OpenStack Summit in Paris. The 6000 person attendance figure alone tells a story of the massive momentum behind this open source software project. Over a 5 day period thousands of vendors, integrators and developers got together to shape the future of this amazing project.

So, what is OpenStack? It is a collection of open source tools and technologies, augmented by commercial tools, that allows customers to build private, public and hybrid cloud services.

I am currently involved in a project to build a cloud platform that will deliver public cloud services, and I selected OpenStack as the underlying technology to base my platform on. OpenStack is a relatively unknown quantity in South Africa, and one of the questions I always get asked when discussing my plans, is “why not VMWare or Hyper-V?”. Most people assume that the answer will have something to do with cost, or some crusade against big and evil tech empires. The answer is actually quite simple. OpenStack is the only platform today, that allows customers to build the cloud they want, with no vendor lock in. And while there are other open cloud platforms out there, OpenStack has the largest and most vibrant community, with the largest partner eco system. The challenge and opportunities lie in the fact that it is not a pre-packaged product (that is changing with most open source vendors now offering easy to deploy systems for enterprise use) but a framework that allows you to make component selections to build the cloud you need. The Lego of the cloud world 🙂

This was not always the case. In the earlier releases (Grizzly, Folsom, Havana etc) there was a lot of features missing, and the toolset was difficult to deploy. The latest release is Juno, and the community is working to release Kilo in a few months time. Today, the stack is easy to deploy, with distributions and vendors such as SUSE, Red Hat, Mirantis, Canonical, HP and IBM all having easy to use deployment tools. Vendors such as Canonical and Mirantis take this deployment further, with their FUEL and JuJu tools providing several deployment options, making OpenStack as easy to deploy as traditional virtualization technologies. The partner ecosystem has dramatically expanded, with more and more companies providing focussed add-on’s for the platform, making it easier to deploy, operate and manage this environment.

The layer above the basic cloud platform Infrastructure-as-a-Service layer has also expanded. Platform-as-a-Service tools, container technology and others such as software defined network and network function virtualization are all driving the new applications and services that allows businesses to be more agile with their technology services.

The use cases for the cloud platforms feature three recurring themes. More speed, more agility, less cost. We now live in an era where “credit card” decisions are made, where a manager will swipe a company credit card to buy and instantly access a service if internal IT moves too slow. The way savvy companies counter this, to maintain control while delivering on the new business requirements for faster availability of infrastructure and services, is to deploy clouds internally. I saw several case studies being presented where companies shared their numbers of how fast services can now be deployed and adopted, and how their internal IT user satisfaction scores went up.

It is important to note that virtualization and cloud are not terms to be used interchangeably. Yes, OpenStack contains virtualization (select your hypervisor from KVM, Hyper-V, ESXi or XEN and others), but it provides technology for an “Amazon AWS like” web layer where users can authenticate and select options to be deployed as they need them. Traditional virtualization vendors such as VMWare are also throwing their weight behind OpenStack, integrating their technology with OpenStack to provide a single control plane and great user experience.

What does this mean for South African companies? In short, you now have access to a set of technologies that enables you to make smart choices, delivering IT as a service, providing your users with a great, flexible platform, capable of quickly delivering infrastructure and apps.

If you’d like more info, to see how this can work for your business, leave a comment and I’ll reach out to you.

About Thomas Lee

I am a technology entrepreneur, father of two young boys, and husband to Mari. Love technology, audio and stuff with wheels.
Bookmark the permalink.

One Comment

  1. Nicely put!

Comments are closed